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How Multidisciplinary Treatment Helps Children with Autism

There are many benefits to providing children with Autism a collaboration of different therapies in addition to Applied Behavior Analysis services. blog-autism-main-landscape

  • Occupational therapy (OT) provides children with skills to help regulate themselves. These skills may help decrease inappropriate stims and help provide children with more socially acceptable skills for regulation.
    • OT can provide children with strategies to help with motor skills.
    • OT can have a different perspective on activities of daily living and as such can provide different and alternative interventions to increase independence on self-care activities.
    • OT improves children independent living skills, such as self-care.
  • Speech therapy can help children with functional communication skills. Speech and Language Pathologists (SLPs) can provide additional support to the children to develop communication skills.
    • SLPs may also provide education and the introduction of alternatives to vocal communication in the form of augmentative devices or picture exchange communication system (PECS).
  • Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA) develops personal one-on-one interventions for children to develop functional skills.
    • ABA focuses on helping children with social, academic, and behavioral concerns.
    • ABA will also focus on providing children with skills for functional communication.
  • Physical therapy (PT) can help provide children with additional motor function and can help with children who have low muscle town or balance issues.
    • PT can also help with coordination for children.
  • Collaboration of all therapies can help ensure that the most effective treatment is provided to the child in all settings.

Fusion of all therapies will provide children exposure to different strategies and interventions in different settings to help with day-to-day life.

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, Hinsdale and Milwaukee! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

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What Will My Child Experience in a Physical Therapy Session?

The field of pediatric physical therapy is very different from many other physical therapy settings, which is to be expected since the patients are children who are constantly growing, developing and learning new skills. Parents are therefore often unsure of what their child’s physical therapy session will look like. blog-physical therapy-session-main-landscape

While the activities performed will be unique and individualized to your child’s specific needs, there are some common things that all children will experience during a physical therapy session.

  • Choices-We want physical therapy to be a fun and productive experience for your child, so throughout the session your child will be provided with choices. These choices may include selecting an activity from a few options, or getting to choose what game, puzzle, or toy is played with while working.
  • Fun-Although your son or daughter will be asked to perform activities to address his or her specific difficulties, we will do our best to make every activity as fun and engaging as possible. The activities we work on are so much more meaningful when your child is having fun and wants to participate.
  • Work-As mentioned above, your child’s therapy sessions will be as fun and engaging as possible. However, your child will be participating in activities that are physically challenging. Your child will be moving for the majority of the session in order to work towards his or her individual goals.
  • Encouragement-Your child’s therapist is there to support and encourage your child. We know that your child is working hard to meet his or her goals, and we are there to provide positivity and encouragement with fun and challenging tasks.
  • Homework-Your child will be working hard during the therapy session, although what is done at home to carryover the new skills learned is just as important. Your child’s therapy session will therefore include homework to help facilitate progress toward his or her specific goals.
  • Success-While the activities selected for your child’s therapy session will be challenging, your therapist will never ask your child to do something that she won’t be successful at. Working hard and being successful is what the physical therapy session is all about!

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, and Hinsdale! If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

W-Sitting: Why There Are Conflicting Opinions and Why Your Child’s Therapist Cares So Much

If you have a child who loves that “w” position while sitting on the ground, chances are you’ve either W-Sittingcorrected them yourself or heard someone else direct them to sit “criss-cross” or “fix their feet.” The challenge, however, is understanding why there are so many conflicting opinions on the matter. Is it really that bad? There was recently an article on Today.com titled “Why W-sitting is really not so bad for kids, after all.” Two orthopedic surgeons weigh-in on how w-sitting is a position that children sit in because their anatomy allows it, it feels comfortable, and when you should be concerned about it.

As a physical therapist, I felt it was important to address this article in a way other than pointing out our profession’s fears of w-sitting, which can be found in “What’s Wrong With W-Sitting?” and “W-Sitting and Your Child’s Growth.

I want to acknowledge that, to some extent, I agree with this article. The anatomy, angles, and alignment of a child’s leg bones changes extensively throughout young childhood. Children do have more flexibility which can make w-sitting often a preferred position. And most often, prolonged w-sitting will not progress to the point of being a surgical issue. If your child only sometimes sits in this position and can easily move into and out of it, it is probably not a big deal. (Please note: as with the article above, I am generalizing this blog post. I am just discussing w-sitting and am not going to address the impairments that often result in w-sitting: low muscle tone, decreased core strength, excessive femoral anteversion, etc. Please speak with your pediatrician or see a physical therapist if you have concerns with your child’s development. Sometimes w-sitting is the result of other things going on which can impact their gross motor success.)

So—why do people like myself lovingly attempt to annoy your child out of w-sitting? It is not that physical therapists do not acknowledge the natural development of their anatomy and what feels best. It is that we are bombarded throughout our schooling, clinical experiences, and our entire professional careers of what occurs when muscles are not aligned “within normal limits.” For pediatric therapists, we are given this unique and wonderful opportunity to work with bodies who are just beginning their development, moldable, and are constantly changing to assess and promote optimal alignment- a strong foundation for a strong life. For me, it does not matter if your child is coming to me for shoulder pain- I am going to correct how their legs are positioned while they are sitting; posture is like the “eat your vegetables” and “brush your teeth” of my profession. I want each child’s physical growth and development to occur on top of the best possible foundation. Just as pediatricians and dentists want to establish healthy habits, routines, and lifestyles for short and long term health, physical therapists want to encourage the best posture for your child so that they will not be limited or suffer from the painful conditions or injuries that result from poor alignment and muscle imbalances.

An easy example to compare w-sitting to is poor sitting or standing posture. Almost all adults can relate to the neck and back pain that can occur from poor posture. In addition, poor posture can contribute to nerve impingement, shoulder pain/injury, jaw pain, sciatica, etc. This pain did not happen as your parents/grandparents/teachers/caregivers encouraged you to “sit up straight” or “stop slouching”—it happened later as the bad movement patterns continued and the muscle imbalances grew worse. In my mind, w-sitting is the same. It may resolve and you may never develop pain, or these movement patterns and muscle imbalances may progress; when you look at the alignment and muscle activation that w-sitting encourages, physical therapists think of the following (to name a few): patellofemoral syndrome, hip pain from impingement, flat feet and foot pain, knee osteoarthritis, and increased risk of knee and ankle injuries.

As the parent, how you use information is up to you. As a physical therapist, I will continue to kindly request that each child sits “criss-cross applesauce” for their current AND future development.

NSPT offers services in Bucktown, Evanston, Highland Park, Lincolnwood, Glenview, Lake Bluff, Des Plaines, and Hinsdale. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates!

Video Games That Get You Moving

Getting your child off the couch and active can be challenging. With video games and iPads, it can be hard to pry your child away from the screens. But what if the screens can work for you? There are many video games on various systems that get your body moving, heart rate up, and can be a lot of fun!

Here are a few games on different systems that will surely make your child break a sweat while having a great time!Blog-Video-Games-Main-Portrait

  1. Xbox – Kinect Sports

Kinect Sports uses a sensor to track your body movements while playing fun sports games including soccer, volleyball, baseball and more. Unlike other systems that only track your upper body, Kinect Sports also tracks your legs for a full body workout!

If you are looking for more intense activities, try Track and Field. Go for the gold in sprints, hurdles, the long jump, and discus – you’ll feel like you’re in the Olympics!

  1. Wii Sports

Wii Sports uses a wand controller to simulate the real game. This systems features games like baseball, golf, tennis, boxing and bowling. The greatest part: you can play against a friend!

  1. PlayStation Move + Eye

The PlayStation Move is a wand controller that works with the PlayStation Eye camera to track the player’s movements. Because some of the games use both the wand and the Eye, you will be put into the game, literally! The PlayStation Move features games such as soccer, tennis, bowling, golf, dancing, and more.

  1. Just Dance – Xbox 360, Wii and PlayStation

Just Dance is compatible with many systems that use a camera to track your movements. You can dance with three of your friends to today’s top hits and yesterday’s classics. This is my personal favorite to have fun and exercise in a creative way.

Now that you have a list of some awesome, fun games for your home system, it’s time to get active and move your body!

NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview, Lake Bluff and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

White Sox Benetti

Living the Dream | An Interview With Chicago White Sox Announcer Jason Benetti

Every day at NSPT, we welcome families into our clinics. Each child is so incredibly unique with their Jason-Benettitreatment, their diagnosis, the challenges they may face, the strengths that they have, etc. We are often told by parents that their biggest question is “what’s next for their child?” “Will they succeed in life?” At NSPT, our mission is to help each and every kiddo reach their maximum potential…whatever that may be.

Jason Benetti, the newest addition to the broadcasting team for the Chicago White Sox, is living his own childhood dream. At a young age, Jason was diagnosed with Cerebral Palsy. Like our families, there was a point in time where maybe his family had the same questions about “what’s next?” He recalls at a young age going through a few surgeries and spending time at the Rehab Institute of Chicago. “Everyone there was just wonderful,” said Benetti. A typical week at a young age included Physical and Occupational Therapy and focusing on building range of motion.

Benetti grew up on the Southside in Homewood and is a graduate of Homewood-Flossmoor High School. Initially, he was a member of the band playing tuba. “That probably wasn’t the best thing for me to be doing,” joked Benetti. It was at that time the band director asked him if he would be interested in sitting in the press box during games and calling out the next set as the band was performing. This was the beginning of a growing passion for broadcasting. Homewood-Flossmoor was one of few high schools that had their own radio station, so Benetti was able to further pursue and develop his skills.

Upon graduation, Jason attended Syracuse University to pursue a career in broadcasting. While there, he was able to continue to build his skills as the Triple A announcer for the Toronto Blue Jays. But nothing fits quite like being able to land your dream job with your favorite team growing up. We were able to sit down with Jason and ask him about what it’s like to be a broadcaster for his hometown team, the Chicago White Sox.

Were there any broadcasters you wanted to be like growing up?

Benetti: There were a lot of people, Hawk Harrelson was the guy I would mimic with catchphrases walking around saying, and “You can put it on the board, YES!” But I’m not particularly a catch phrase guy myself. So Hawk was the guy. He has been so encouraging of me doing half of the games with Steve Stone, just genuine and kind.

When you first expressed interest, what did people around you say? Was there adversity or support?

Benetti: As a radio guy, no one cared what I looked like. Viv Bernstein did a story in early 2010 and asked me if there was a ceiling with regards to TV. It took time for people to warm up to the fact that I can’t look into the camera or have a commanding strut walking into a room, so perceptively there was an adjustment period for people. I quickly found great allies with Time Warner in Syracuse and ESPN. Once they got to know me, they were supportive. It just takes one person.

If you could call a game for any baseball player, who would it be? Retired or current.

Benetti: Growing up Robin Ventura was my favorite player, so in a way, I now get to call games for him.

What are you most looking forward to this season?

Benetti: I’m looking forward to the development of the rapport between myself and Steve Stone. We have only had one game so far, but I felt comfortable after and am excited to have the partnership develop. Steve has such a wealth of knowledge. It’s going to be a lot of fun.

What was it like sitting in the booth at US Cellular Field for the first time?

Benetti: It was just like another game, but with way more people interested. I’ve done so many baseball games and baseball is baseball. There weren’t really nerves, just a new experience.

What is it like working alongside hall of fame broadcaster Steve Stone?

Benetti: Anyone who is creative grows up wanting to be around other people like that. Steve Stone and crew fulfills that 100 percent. To be in a room with everyone wanting to do great work, to work with someone who expands like Steve, is everything anyone could want in a partner doing games.

Do you ever meet with or talk to young athletes? Or young individuals with CP or other disabilities? What is the one thing you tell them?

Benetti: I would tell them if you think people perceive you a certain way, you are not crazy and they might be, but do everything you can to disregard that and get past it, it could be damaging to the relationship. It is happening, but trust yourself to get past it.

And one final question…you heard it here first…Prediction…will it be a Cubs vs. White Sox World Series?

Benetti: I’m going to say yeah, it would be great fun. The Billy Goat couldn’t be blamed. Someone would have huge bragging rights for a long time.

NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview, Lake Bluff and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

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How is Torticollis Diagnosed?

Congenital muscular Torticollis should be a suspected diagnosis if your infant demonstrates a preferred head position or posture. Infants will present with reduced cervical range of motion, a potential palpable mass in the sternocleidomasoid muscle and/or craniofacial asymmetry.BlogTorticollisDiagnosis-Main-Landscape

A diagnosis is made by your pediatrician and can usually be done based on a simple history and physical examination. Physical examination findings may include:

  • Head tilt to one side
  • Reduced range of motion
  • Palpable SCM tightness
  • Absence of findings associated with non-muscular causes of congenital Torticollis

[1] Cheng JC, Tang SP, Chen TM, et al. The clinical presentation and outcome of treatment of congenital muscular torticollis in infants–a study of 1,086 cases. J Pediatric Surg 2000; 35:1091.

[2] Kaplan SL, Coulter C, Fetters L. Physical therapy management of congenital muscular torticollis: an evidence-based clinical practice guideline: from the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. Pediatr Phys Ther 2013; 25:348.

NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview, Lake Bluff and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

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fitness goals for kids

Fitness Goals For Elementary Aged Children

Parents often wonder if their children are happy and healthy. While most children will let you know if they are happy or not, determining a child’s health may require some more investigative work. A child’s innate athleticism, or lack thereof, may make a child appear more or less fit than they actually are. Here are some fitness standards pulled from standardized gross motor tests, the Presidential FitnessGram, and endurance norms for 6-12 year old children.

Fitness Standards for Children:Fitness Standards for Elementary Aged Children

6 Year Old

  • Completes 5 sit-ups Independently
  • Completes 8 push-ups with good form, given 1 demonstration
  • Skips forward 10 feet
  • Completes half mile run in 6 minutes

8 Year Old

  • Completes 6 sit-ups Independently
  • Completes 8 push-ups with good form
  • Completes 4 pull-ups
  • Rides a bike 20 feet independently
  • Completes half mile run in 6 minutes

10 Year Old

  • Completes 12 sit-ups Independently
  • Completes 10 push-ups with good form
  • Completes 4 pull-ups
  • Completes mile run in 12 minutes

12 Year Old

  • Completes 18 sit-ups Independently
  • Completes 10 push-ups with good form
  • Completes 4 pull-ups
  • Completes mile run in 9 minutes for boys and 11 minutes for girls

If you feel your child isn’t meeting the above fitness goals, please see the pediatric experts at North Shore Pediatric Therapy for a free physical therapy screening.

north shore pediatric therapy physical therapy

NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview, Lake Bluff and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

NSPT is in-network with United Health Care

North Shore Pediatric Therapy is Now In-Network with United Health Care for Speech, Occupational and Physical Therapy Services

North Shore Pediatric Therapy is now in-network with United Health Care for Speech, Occupational and Physical Therapy services in addition to our current in-network offering of Blue Cross and Blue Shield of Illinois. Our goal is to make our services convenient and accessible to all Chicago area families, and this is one more step toward making that a reality.

According to our CEO, Maria Hammer, “We are excited to provide another option for insurance coverage for many of our current NSPT families and we anticipate being able to help more new families as we go in-network with United Health Care.”

Services that are covered by United Health Care:NSPT is in-network with United Health Care

NSPT also offers Neuropsychological Testing, Applied Behavior Analysis, Social Work, Dietetics, and Academic Services.

With 6 locations, North Shore Pediatric Therapy (NSPT) is the only concierge health and wellness center for children and young adults, that combines the power of multiple disciplines, first class service, and inspiring results, that has become the company’s hallmark. Deemed a Thought Leader in pediatric therapy, NSPT brings Peace of Mind to thousands of children and their families with its invigorating blend of positive environment, heroic staff, and blossoming kids.  NSPT provides the ultimate discovery that challenges can be overcome, and happiness restored.  Our team is comprised of Neuropsychology, Occupational Therapy, Physical Therapy, Speech Therapy, Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), Social Work, Nutrition, and Academic Specialists.  Visit us at www.KidsBlossom.com.

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Physical Therapy versus Personal Training: Key Differences and What’s Best for Your Child

Let me start by explaining what a physical therapist and a personal trainer do and who they can help.

Who is a physical therapist?physical therapy or personal training for your child

A physical therapist is a board certified movement expert. They analyze abnormal movement patterns and, through tests and measures, determine what impairments are causing those patterns. Physical therapists may use a combination of manual therapy, neuromuscular re-education, modalities, and exercises to address those impairments and improve function.

Who is a personal trainer?

The American College of Sports Medicine defines a ACSM certified personal trainer as a person who “is qualified to plan and implement exercise programs for healthy individuals or those who have medical clearance to exercise.”[1] They give advice on general health and wellness tips, personalizing it to each client. Personal trainers may also help you progress your exercise routine.

Which is right for you?

Now that we know what each is and what they do, who is best suited to help you? Well, it depends. If you are a healthy individual who has been cleared for exercise, a personal trainer can help you stick to and progress an exercise plan. When you have a physical impairment that is affecting your function, head to a physical therapist to receive treatment.

While physical therapy may be what’s best for your child at one point in his life, this may change over time. I know many physical therapists that may discharge a child from their care due to completion of goals and return to function, but who recommend continued exercises to maintain those goals. A personal trainer may be helpful at this time to follow through with these recommendations.  Transitioning from physical therapy services to a personal trainer too early can result in return of impairment or injury.

Please consult with a health care professional prior to change in care.

NSPT offers physical therapy services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

Resources: [1] ACSM webpage. “http://certification.acsm.org/acsm-certified-personal-trainer. “ Accessed on 2/1/2015.

Girl with headache

The Role of the Physical Therapist in Post-Concussion Management

 

 

In our blog on Signs of Concussion in Youth Athletes, it became evident that a concussion can result in a wide variety of negative signs and symptoms. Following such an injury, many young athletes are eager to return to their sport. However, complete physical and mental rest are the best things to help the brain recover, and are absolutely necessary during the first 24 hours following a concussion. A physical therapist can be an integral member of the child’s concussion management team in preparing the child to return to sport, or in helping to address impairments resulting from the concussion that may be limiting the child’s school or daily functioning. Below is a list of interventions a physical therapist may be able to provide to a child who suffered a concussion injury:

  • Girl with headacheManagement of neck pain or cervicogenic headache: A cervicogenic headache is one that is caused by injury or tightness in the neck muscles or due to limitations in mobility of the neck joints. Since these structures attach to your skull, impairments there can result in headaches. Your physical therapist can help with manual therapy and exercises to increase mobility of these structures in order to alleviate headaches.
  • Balance and coordination training: It is very common to have balance or coordination difficulties following a concussion. A physical therapist can help to re-train and strengthen these systems in order to restore function.
  • Graded return to physical activity: When your child has been cleared by the pediatrician to return to physical activity, the physical therapist can help with a gradual return to activity while closely monitoring concussion symptoms. It is important to ease back into exercise starting with light aerobic activities before participating in moderate or intense physical activities or sport-specific training.
  • Gradual return to specific sport: Once the athlete has returned to aerobic exercise with no worsening of symptoms, the physical therapist can then begin to introduce sport-specific training drills and gradual return to practice and competition.

It is important to note that your child should be closely monitored by your pediatrician or primary care physician initially following the injury, as well as frequently throughout your child’s course of treatment. Your physical therapist should also update your pediatrician with your child’s symptoms and response with return to physical activity. Please contact North Shore Pediatric Therapy to schedule an appointment with one of our physical therapists if your child has recently suffered a concussion or continues to suffer from post-concussion impairments.