The Benefits of Bilingualism

There are definitive advantages for children who are learning two languages simultaneously. Though parents may question whether or not they should teach their child to be bilingual, research has proven that bilingual children develop language skills in the same manner as peers who are learning one language.

Parents should begin using both languages from the start and continue to give their child opportunities tobilingual hear and communicate in both languages throughout their daily routines. Bilingual children typically have a dominant language; that is, one that they know better and use more proficiently. Learning two languages simultaneously does NOT hinder speech and language development. If a child truly has a language disorder, this will be evident in both languages. Additionally, bilingualism may confuse grammatical rules or use words from both languages in the same sentence, and this should not be concerning.

According to the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, research has demonstrated a variety of benefits to being bilingual including:

  • Being able to learn new words easily
  • Playing rhyming games with words like “cat” and “hat”
  • Breaking down words by sounds, such as C-A-T for cat
  • Being able to use information in new ways
  • Putting words into categories
  • Coming up with solutions to problems
  • Developing good listening skills
  • Connecting with others

Language learning follows patterns. Developing sounds in the first language may further support how a child learns and uses their second language. ASHA also reports that currently 1 in 5 individuals over the age of 5 speak a language other than English at home. Subsequently, simultaneously language learning is becoming more common and is expected to increase over time.

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NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview, Lake Bluff and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

What to Expect in a Pediatric Speech and Language Evaluation

The purpose of a speech and language evaluation is to determine your child’s strengths and challenges related to a variety of areas and conclude if therapy would be beneficial in further developing skills and aiding his/her ability to communicate effectively with SLPmainothers. Parents may request an evaluation if they have concerns, or children may be referred by a pediatrician, teacher, or after a developmental screening. While it may vary across settings, the following is a general outline of what you can expect from a formal speech and language evaluation.

  • Background and Developmental Information: Upon beginning the process, most facilities will request information regarding your child’s early developmental history. This will include things such as birth history, age milestones were met, and significant medical history. If your child has previously participated in therapy or related developmental/educational evaluations, providing copies of these reports to your therapist will be extremely beneficial in helping develop the whole picture of your child. In some settings, the therapist will obtain information from your child’s teacher regarding challenges specifically related to classroom learning and peer relationships.
  • Caregiver Interview: An essential portion of the evaluation will be information provided by the child’s family. The therapist will guide a discussion regarding your major concerns, what you would like to achieve by participating in the evaluation, and goals you might have for your child. The therapist may ask for specific examples of times you’ve noticed these challenges, thoughts about your child’s awareness toward the issue, and other questions to develop an overall understanding of how your child is communicating. Depending on the age of the child, he/she may participate in the interview portion to share feelings and thoughts on the area of difficulty, and what he/she would like to accomplish. Based on the background information provided and the caregiver interview, the therapist will choose assessment tool(s) to evaluate the area(s) of concern.
  • Assessment and Observation of the Child: Initially the therapist will spend time talking and/or playing with your child to develop rapport and make observations based on how he/she interacts and communicates in an unstructured setting. Then, your child will participate in assessments that may include:
    • Oral motor assessment to observe the structures of the face and mouth at rest and while speaking, as well as oral musculature and motor planning of oral movements.
    • Standardized assessment of the area(s) of concern (not an exhaustive list)
      • Expressive (what he/she produces) language and/or Receptive (what he/she understands) language
      • Speech production and fluency of speech
      • Pragmatic or social language
      • Feeding and Swallowing
      • Reading/Writing skills
  • Evaluation Report: The therapist will then compile all of the information gathered from the family, observations, and assessments and summarize it in a formal report. It will include a description of each area of assessment and its findings. Based on the results, the therapist will determine if therapy is necessary and if so, develop a plan for treatment. Specific goals to target the areas of need and a time frame for doing so will be included in the report.

Meet-With-A-Speech-Pathologist
NSPT offers services in BucktownEvanstonHighland ParkLincolnwoodGlenview, Lake Bluff and Des Plaines. If you have questions or concerns about your child, we would love to help! Give us a call at (877) 486-4140 and speak to one of our Family Child Advocates today!

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ARTICULATION CHECKLIST FOR AGES 3-6

Find out if your child has a possible Articulation Disorder with our Easy Checklist.

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What is an Articulation Disorder? 
Articulation disorders refer to errors in speech sounds by mispronouncing, substituting, or leaving out the sound. It is age-appropriate for children at certain ages to be producing errors with particular sounds. However, if a child is producing an error with a sound that they should have acquired, they may have an articulation disorder. Articulation disorders may impact a child’s speech intelligibility when communicating with others.
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With This Easy to Use, Free Checklist You Will:
  • Identify issues and have the opportunity to provide appropriate help to enable your child/student’s success.
  • Have a great tool at Parent/Teacher conferences.
  • Have a true understanding if your student/child’s daily and school social interactions are negatively affected by a possible undiagnosis of Articulation Difficulties
This Checklist is a must for any parent, teacher or physician looking to find answers!
Fill out the form to the left to download your free copy of the Checklist.

Pediatric Stuttering and Fluency Checklist

Find out more about your child’s speech development with our Easy Checklist.

With This Easy to Use, One Page Free Stuttering and Fluency Checklist You Can:

  • Keep track of your child’s speech and fluency progress
  • Bring it with you to discuss with your pediatrician!
  • This Checklist is a must for any parent, teacher or physician looking to find answers!

We’d love to talk to you directly about your speech and language questions. Call us at (877)486-4140, and we will happily answer any of your questions!

 

3 YEAR OLD MILESTONE GUIDE eBOOK

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Find Out If Your Child Is Meeting The Developmental Milestones Of A Typical 3 Year Old With Our Easy-To-Follow Guide.

With This Easy to Use, Free Comprehensive Milestone Guide You Will:

  • Identify weaknesses and have the opportunity to provide appropriate help to enable your child/student’s success.
  • Have a great tool at Parent/Teacher conferences.

Greater understanding of the following areas:

  • Speech & Language Skills
  • Gross & Fine Motor Skills
  • Behavior Skills
  • Cognitive Skills
  • Social/Emotional Skills

 

This Checklist is a must for any parent, teacher or physician looking to find answers!