Supporting Your Child To Make Friends | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s webisode, our  Marriage and Family Counselor gives us some wonderful take away tips on what to do when your child tells you he/she has no friends.

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • When and how to listen to your child’s social problems
  • How to respond to your child
  • What questions to ask your child
  • Suggestions and tips to help your child be more social

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman, and today I’m standing with marriage and family
counselor Beth Chung. Beth, can you tell us how to help children
make friends?

Beth: Sure. I think this is a really important question and one that I get
asked pretty often. In our previous segment of Pediatric TV, Dr.
Stasi was really talking about tailoring the treatment of
helping your child make friends to each child’s individual
strengths and growth areas and needs. Today I’ll just touch on
some general strategies, but I’d really encourage parents to
keep that tidbit in mind.

One really important strategy, I think, which is often
overlooked, is to really listen to your child. I think a lot of
times parents realize that their child is struggling when he or
she comes to their parents and says, “Mom, dad, I have no
friends. No one wants to hang out with me.” It can feel really
tempting for parents to say, “No, that’s not true. I’m sure you
have tons of friends,” or, “Who cares what other kids think?”
It’s a way to reassure their child, but really it can minimize
your child’s concerns and prevent them from coming to you in the
future.

Something that I would suggest is something as simple as, “That
must be really hard,” or, “I bet it feels really tough when
you’re picked last in gym. I can understand why you might feel
like you have no friends,” even if you may feel differently,
because as soon as your child feels heard and accepted, you can
move on to some problem solving. This is a really great way to
help your child to feel more empowered.

Asking open-ended questions such as, “One possible reason is
that you don’t have friends, which is why you’re alone on the
playground. What else could it mean?” Coming up with suggestions
such as, “Well, you’re new in school and the kids might have
some other friends, and they might be shy to ask you to play,”
or, “Maybe they don’t know that you want to play with them,” are
some good suggestions to offer.

Another really good open-ended question is, “How can you show
that you want to be friends?” Coming up with a list of concrete
skills, such as asking to join in a game, asking someone to play
a game with them, saying hello, or complimenting are strategies
that your children can practice at home. You can make it fun and
role play with your kids. If you’re driving to the playground,
you can say, “All right, Carrie. Today we’re going to go to the
playground and if you see two girls playing house together, how
can you ask them to play? What are two things you can do?” This
can really help your child to feel empowered.

Those are some strategies that I’d suggest. But again, it’s
really important to reach out to the school, the teachers, the
principal, the social worker, as Dr. Stasi mentioned in our
previous segment, to really tailor this to each child’s unique
needs and growth areas.

Robyn: Thank you so much, Beth, and thank you to our viewers. And
remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

When Should You Take A Pacifier Away | Pediatric Therapy TV

Pediatric Speech and Language Pathologist explains when a parent should take a pacifier away from a baby or toddler.

In this Video You Will Learn:

  • If there is a specific age to take the pacifier away
  • How sucking on a pacifier can cause feeding and speech difficulties
  • What kind of pacifier a child should be using

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV where we provide experience and innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now, your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn Ackerman. Today, I’m standing with speech and language pathologist, Allison Raino. Allison, can you tell us at what age a child should stop using a pacifier?

Allison: Sure. Unfortunately, there’s no definitive age but what I can talk about are the limitations that pacifiers have on oral development. The first reason why pacifiers can become problematic is the amount of time the baby has a pacifier in their mouth, and the second being the size and the shape of the pacifier.

As the baby transition into chewing, jaw strength and stability is very important developmental growth, and sucking on a pacifier drastically limits the amount of jaw movements, reducing the strength and stability which could cause future feeding and speech difficulties.

The second being the size and the shape of the pacifier. The pacifiers that are rounded on the top and flat on the bottom, they’re too big for the baby’s mouth. The pacifiers that are rounded on all sides, those are preferred because it puts the tongue in a more natural position.

So, my two suggestions would be to limit the amount of time the pacifier is used as well as using the pacifier that is rounded on all sides.

Robyn: All right. Thank you for those suggestions and thank you to all of our viewers for watching. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV where we bring peace of mind to your family with the best in educational programming.

To subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs or learn more, visit our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

How To Tie A Shoe Part 2 | Pediatric Therapy Tv

IN TODAY’S WEBISODE, A PEDIATRIC OCCUPATIONAL THERAPIST SHOWS US THE  SECOND PART IN TEACHING CHILDREN “HOW TO TIE THEIR SHOES”.   CLICK HERE TO READ A BLOG WITH HOW TO STEPS ON SHOE TYING:

Click here to watch part 1 of the How To Teach Shoe Tying Video

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • The step by step guide of teaching a child How To Tie a Shoe

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. In today’s segment, Marissa Edwards, pediatric
occupational therapist, will be showing us how to teach tying a
shoe. Marissa?

Marissa: Hi. This is part two of “Teaching Your Child How To Tie Their
Shoes.” The story that I use is “The Pirate Story” and I’m going
to go through that story with you right now. You can also find
this on the ADVANCE for Occupational Therapists website.

We start with the laces separated and we say, ‘X marks the
spot’. Then we have to put the key inside the treasure chest,
and we have to hurry up and lock it tight because the pirates
are coming. Then we find an island because we need to bury our
treasure.

We find an island, and we have to walk around the island to make
sure there are no pirates on the island. Then we take our shovel
– there are no pirates, by the way – we take our shovel, we dig
into the island, and then we have to bury it really, really
deep. And that’s it.

Robyn: Thank you, Marissa, and thank you to our viewers. And remember,
keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

To watch more Pediatric Therapy TV Webisodes Click Here!

How To Improve Handwriting Skills, Part 2 | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In part 2 of How To Improve Handwriting Skills, Occupational Therapist works on specific  handwriting techniques with a student.  (Click here For Part 1)

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • What’s the best sitting position for good handwriting
  • What is a slant-board and how it can help
  • What is a helper hand

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. Today I am standing with occupational therapist
Deborah Michael. Deborah’s going to show us how to work with a
child on handwriting.

Deborah: You have to stay between the two red lines, right? All right,
are you ready? How’s your engine feeling now? A little slower,
right? Okay. Which pencil are you going to use?

Child: This one.

Deborah: Okay. Here goes the timer. Are you ready?

Child: What should I write?

Deborah: Well, let’s see your shirt. How about ‘Go Blackhawks’? Ready?
Okay, now you want to make sure your feet are on the floor, your
elbows are at the right height, and the chair is very important,
the chair you’re on. We already talked about that. The ball, the
chair, the blanket, go.

Make it a capital. Hit those two red lines. Let’s move this up a
little bit. Go ahead.

This is a slant board, which is easier to write on and also
easier when you’re copying from a blackboard. Here, let me get
that. I just wanted to show everybody. The slant board, when
you’re copying from the wall, it’s just easier than going all
the way down to the floor.

Child: Is ‘hawks’ capitalized?

Deborah: You have it right here. You can capitalize the whole thing.
There you go. Well, now you’re going really slowly. Let’s make
it a little bit faster because your time’s almost up. We
definitely slowed you down. Nice. Now let’s just copy this. You
can see how it’s a little bit easier with this slant board to
copy this. Just write ‘2010’ right there.

Beautiful. Just one more thing. Wait, this is your helper hand.
You need your helper hand on the paper. Go ahead. Good work. All
done. High-five. OK. Go take a break. Go run around.

Robyn: Thank you Deborah, and thank you to our viewers. And remember,
keep on blossoming!

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

3 Tips For A Less Stressful Meal Time | Pediatric Therapy TV

Marriage and family counselor gives viewers 3 top tips to have a less stressful meal time with the family. For more meal time tips click here:

 In This Video You Will Learn:

  • How to transition your family to mealtime
  • Why rituals help with the transition to dinnertime
  • How to make meal times and dinner time fun for the family

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello, and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host,
Robyn Ackerman. Today I am standing with marriage and family
counselor Beth Chung. Beth, can you give us three tips to make
mealtime a little less stressful?

Beth: Sure. This is such a great question. Mealtimes can be especially
stressful because there are so many components involved. In
exploring this question, I’ll touch on three various components
of mealtime, the first being transitions.

Transitions can be really tough. Oftentimes before mealtime,
kids are watching TV, playing a game, doing homework, and
engaging in activities that they either like or really want to
get done before mealtime, so the switch to mealtime can be
challenging. Something that I would suggest to parents is to use
a warning system, to say, “All right, kids. In ten minutes it’s
time to turn off the TV, put your toys away, and walk over to
the dinner table.” And then another warning in five, and then
two. “All right, guys. Time to turn off the TV. Time to walk
over together.”

You can either give verbal warnings or you can use a timer. A
timer can be fun because your kids can set it up, and as soon as
the buzzer goes off, they know that it’s time to walk over
together. It’s especially helpful, too, if you can be physically
present to walk them over, walking to the television room,
turning it off, and walking with your children together.

And going along with that, another component is that of rituals.
It’s nice to have a ritual that can signal the transition from
playtime or TV time to dinner time. Something as simple as
walking together and doing a high-five or a hand motion that you
make up together, or singing a song together, to signal that
it’s dinner time. Those things can make it fun and can be a
physical reminder that the time has switched and it’s meal time.

The third component is that of conversations. Dinner time is a
really great time to talk with your children. Talk about how
their day was and see what they’re feeling. You can make this
fun. For example, every day someone can take a turn coming up
with a topic. On Mondays you might talk about robots. On
Tuesdays, you might talk about flowers. You can use other games.
I really like ‘Roses and Thorns’. Everyone gives one rose,
something positive from the day, and one thorn, something
negative from the day. Or the ‘I’m Thankful’ game, talking about
something you’re thankful for about the person on your left.
This can make meal times fun and also educational for children
to practice some of those social skills together.

Those are just some strategies that I would suggest to make meal
time a little more enjoyable for everyone involved.

Robyn: Wow. Thank you, Beth, and thank you to our viewers. And
remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

How To Tie A Shoe Part 1 | Pediatric Therapy TV

In today’s webisode, a Pediatric Occupational Therapist shows us the first steps in teaching a child “How To Tie Their Shoes”.   Click here to read a blog with how to steps on shoe tying:

Click Here For Part 2 Of Shoe Tying

In this Video You Will Learn:

  • When your child is ready to tie shoes
  • What materials you need to prepare your child for shoe tying
  • What story you should use when teaching your child to tie shoes

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. In today’s segment, Marissa Edwards, Pediatric
Occupational Therapist, will be showing us how to teach tying a
shoe. Marissa?

Marissa: Hi. The first part of today’s how-to, which is shoelace tying,
is how to prepare your child to be able to accomplish this
skill. First of all, shoelace tying is an expected skill for a
child to achieve by the age of 7 years old. So just keep that in
mind. Kids a lot younger than that can also tie their shoes, but
it is expected by 7.

Kids are going to need a lot of repetition in order to learn how
to do this skill. All kids are different. Some kids may need six
months or more of repetition in order to get it. Some kids may
need just a few weeks. It’s all based on their own abilities.

A strategy I use to help kids start to learn this skill is I
teach them how to make friendship bracelets. Just by doing that
initial knot over and over and over, they get that skill down
and mastered. Another strategy that I will use sometimes is
using two different colored laces because that will help the
child to remember which lace does what.

Then the way that I teach kids is I use a pirate story, which
was actually published in the Advanced Magazine for Occupational
Therapists. In the next part of this segment I am going to
actually show you the story.

Robyn: Thank you, Marissa, and thank you to our viewers. And remember,
keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

When A Child Should Be Able To Read | Pediatric Therapy Tv

Pediatric Neuropsychologist answers what age a child should recognize words by and be able to read by.

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • What is the first stage of Reading
  • What reading milestones a child should reach by different ages
  • When a child she have developed reading comprehension

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. I’m standing here today with Dr. Greg Stasi, a
pediatric neuropsychologist. Dr. Stasi, what age would you say a
child should be able to read by?

Dr. Stasi: Thanks, Robyn. That’s a great question. That’s a hard answer to
give and the reason behind it is we really have to think of the
different components of reading.

The first stage of reading is phonological processing and
phonological awareness, which is being able to identify letter
sounds and the letter combination sounds. For example, B-A is
‘ba’. We’d expect that around age 5, when a child is in
preschool and kindergarten.

Actual reading, being able to combine words together, about
first grade and second grade is when that skill starts to
develop. And then comprehension, where we understand what we are
actually reading, that again is going to be consistent with
first and second grade.

So to answer your question, kindergarten and preschool, we
really want to hit home with the letter awareness and the
combination of letters, so knowing the phonological processing
piece. Thank you.

Robyn: Thank you very much, Dr. Stasi, and thank you to our viewers.
And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

How To Encourage Sharing | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In the Webisode below a Board Certified Behavioral Analyst answers a question from a viewer on how to easily teach her children about sharing.

Watch this video to learn:

  • The best approaches to teaching the skill of sharing
  • How to increase sharing behavior
  • How to identify reinforcers

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I am your host, Robyn Ackerman. I’m standing here with Benny Howard, a board-certified behavior analyst.

Today we are going to be answering a question from one of our viewers. Melanie from Chicago asks, “My 9-year-old son has a hard time sharing his toys with his younger brother. How can I encourage them to share?”

Benny: With any skill, it’s very important to start off easy and work your way up to the more difficult tasks. With sharing, you want to take the same approach. Start off with something that maybe isn’t so preferred, or in other words, is easier for the child to be able to share. If he has a toy that he doesn’t really spend much time with, start off with that toy and really provide that reinforcement for him sharing that toy.

It’s key to identify the reinforcer because if it is not reinforcing for that child, it is not going to increase that behavior of sharing. For example, if a child prefers hugs, then use hugs as a reinforcer. If a child prefers a certain type of edible such as candy, then use those as a reinforcer. The key is to really identify the reinforcer so we know what to use when we catch those moments in which he is able to share. Identify an effective reinforcer and also start easy with the sharing. We don’t expect him to start sharing things like his favorite Spiderman toy. Let’s stick to the easy Pokémon toys if it’s not as reinforcing for him.

Robyn: Thank you very much, Benny, and thank you, Melanie, for submitting your question. Remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

To subscribe to Pediatric Therapy TV Channel Click Here!

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Getting Children To Sit Quietly | Pediatric Therapy Tv

Pediatric Occupational Therapist gives our viewers the top 3 tips to help get children and students to sit quietly in class, circle time or even on the road!

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • What to do before your child sits down
  • Where to sit each child
  • How to keep your child still

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I am your host, Robyn Ackerman. Today I’m standing with pediatric occupational therapist Deborah Michael. Deborah, can you give us the three top tips to getting a child to sit quietly?

Deborah: Absolutely. First of all, you need your child regulated before they sit down. They need to be ready to sit down. If they just came in from recess or from playing outside, they may need to take a few deep breaths to calm themselves down before they sit down.

Secondly, you want to space the kids out correctly. When you’re sitting in circle time, you want to put Sarah in front and little Peter to the side and left so he doesn’t put his hands in her hair. If you are in a car, you don’t want to put the two siblings that fight the most right next to each other.

And third of all, provide fidgets and movement for children that need it. Maybe they can be squishing a ball or rocking in a rocking chair rather than sitting still and having the heebie-jeebies.

Robyn: Thank you very much, Deborah. Those are great tips. And thank you, also, to our viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

To subscribe to Pediatric Therapy TV Channel Click Here!

To watch more Pediatric Therapy TV Webisodes Click Here!

Speech In Infants | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In Today’s Webisode Below Pediatric Speech and Language Pathologist provides our viewers with quick tips on how to encourage speech in infants.

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