How To Explain Divorce To Children | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s webisode a Licensed Counselor gives viewers tips on how to discuss divorce with children. For tips on dating after a divorce click here:

 

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • Preparation the parents need to have prior to telling children about the divorce
  • Transitioning between homes of divorced parents
  • Why routines are important when parents are divorced

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. Today I’m standing here with Licensed Professional
Counselor Marnie Ehrenberg.

Marnie, can you please let newly-divorced parents know what they
can expect when dealing with their children and letting them
know about becoming divorced?

Marnie: I think it’s really important to have really good conversations
before you let your children know about how you’re going to
explain it to them.

One of the things I see really often with the younger kids is a
lot of confusion and feeling responsible, like they did
something. I think having a story that they can work with, that
they can understand, is really important.

I think it’s also good to think about how you’re going to
transition the children from one house to another. That can be a
pretty stressful new experience. I think routines and rituals
are really important, so talk to them about what can you keep
the same in their life and what’s going to change.

I also think it’s really important to work out all of their
feelings and to make sure that they have somebody that’s really
trusted that they can talk to about all the range of emotions
that they’re going to experience that are really normal.

Robyn: All right. Thank you so much for your help, and thank you to
our viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

3 Transition Helpers For Children | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s webisode, a Pediatric Occupational Therapist gives us tips on 3 different ways to help a child transition from one activity to another. Click here to read a blog about transitions and routines:

 In This Video You Will Learn:

  • How to best prepare your child for a transition
  • Why timers can help your child transition from one activity to the next
  • How a visual schedule can help your child who has difficulty with transitioning

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman.

Today I am standing with Lindsey Miller, a pediatric
occupational therapist. Lindsey, a question I hear all the time
from parents is what are some ideas to help a child transition
better from one activity to another or one class to another?

Lindsey: Transitions can be really tricky times for children because
sometimes they don’t understand the time limits for certain
activities and sometimes it’s difficult for them to abruptly
change from one activity to the next.

One good option is to use a timer. With a timer, you can set it
for about 10 or 15 minutes and tell your child, “You can play
your toy for 10 minutes, and when the buzzer goes off it’s time
to go wash up for dinner.” They already know that when the
buzzer goes off it’s time for them to stop what they’re doing
and then move on to the next activity.

The other option I have is the use of a visual schedule. This is
really good for children because they can see what their day
looks like. You can get pictures from the Internet or pictures
from things around the house such as doing your homework,
dinnertime, playtime, bath time, and time for bed. The child can
refer to the schedule when it’s time to do the next activity.
When they’re done with their homework they can take off the
picture of the homework and set it aside, and they already know
that the next thing they’re going to do is go to dinner.

The last thing is giving your child a verbal warning for what’s
about to happen. If they’re playing a video game you can say,
“Ten more minutes and we’re going to go wash up for dinner.”
Then remind them again at five minutes, saying, “Five more
minutes and then it’s time to wash up for dinner.” Then remind
them at three minutes and at one minute, and then you can say,
“All right. It’s time to be done. We’re going to go wash up
now.” They already know what they’re supposed to do next.

Robyn: It seems what really helps children is knowing and having that
expectation that something is about to end and something else is
going to begin.

Lindsey: Exactly.

Robyn: Great. Thank you so much, and thank you for bringing the
visuals as well. It’s very helpful. Thank you to our viewers,
and remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

Tips For A Child With Sensory Overload | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s webisode, a Pediatric Occupational Therapist gives our viewers practical tips on how to help a child who may experience Sensory Overload. Click here for more resources on Sensory Processing Disorder.

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • Calming options for children with Sensory Overload
  • What type of visuals you can use for a child with Sensory Overload
  • Prepping strategies for children with Sensory Overload

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman.

Today I’m standing here with Dana Pais, a pediatric occupational
therapist. Dana, can you give us some tips on how to help a
child who may have sensory overload?

Dana: Sure. When a child is experiencing sensory overload you want to
present them with a variety of calming options so that they can
choose. It could be deep breathing, or you can give them deep
pressure input such as a hug or joint compressions, or remove
them from the situation to a calm, dimly lit or quiet room.

Every child is different so you want to make sure you give them
a choice and see what works for them for a particular situation.
I’ve also suggested to families in the past that they carry a
picture menu card with them with all the different strategies on
there. When the situation happens you can show that to the child
and the child will have an easier time to pick what works for
them.

Additionally, a strategy you can do to prep them for a situation
is to review what the situation may entail. For example, if
you’re going to a water park you can start talking about the
water park trip a week in advance. You can show them pictures of
the water park and you can talk about the sights, the sounds,
and the smells that they may experience when they’re there. You
can also visit the water park from the outside before your
actual trip so that they can know what to expect when they’re in
that situation.

Robyn: Thank you so much, Dana, and thank you to our viewers. And
remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

The Use Of Visuals For Speech Development | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s webisode, a Pediatric Speech and Language Pathologist gives details on how different visual aids can help children develop speech.

 In This Video You Will Learn:

  • What is a speech visual
  • What types of visuals can help with the development of speech
  • What ages and conditions the visuals work best with

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. Today I’m standing here with Deanna Swallow, a
pediatric speech and language pathologist. Deanna, can you tell
us what visuals are and how they help children with speech?

Deanna: Sure. A lot of research has been done to find out which ways
children learn the best. It’s been well-documented that children
learn well with a multisensory approach. Because speech and
language rely so heavily on an auditory system, we try to use
the visual system to help enhance a child’s ability to process
and use spoken language.

There are a lot of different ways and reasons that visual
support can be used, depending on the child’s needs. I’ll show
you an example that I made for one of my kids who has difficulty
following directions. I made a schedule for them that had each
different step visually presented so I could speak each step to
the child and then point to it as I spoke. In this example
visuals are used to help process.

For developing toddlers, oftentimes people will use baby sign to
enhance their development of speech. For older children or
children who don’t have means to verbally communicate at all,
sometimes we will use an entirely visually-based communication
system such as PECS, the Picture Exchange Communication System.
This system was developed for preschool-aged children with
autism.

There are a lot of augmentative communication devices that rely
wholly on visual input. Here’s an example of a binder I made for
my kids that has a lot of different activity choices. I’ll use
these in a variety of ways to help children to let me know
different activities they want.

Robyn: Thank you so much, Deanna, and thank you to our viewers. And
remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

Is Thumb-Sucking Okay For A Child’s Speech? | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s webisode A Pediatric Speech and Language Pathologist gives us the low down on thumb sucking and it’s effects on speech.

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • The effects thumb-sucking can have on a child
  • How to identify dental problems
  • Who to ask if there are speech concerns

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. Today I’m standing with pediatric speech and language
pathologist Tanya Lotzof. Tanya, can you tell us if it’s okay
for a toddler to suck their thumb?

Tanya: I think it’s more important to consider the possible effects of
thumb-sucking. Thumb-sucking can affect the shape of a child’s
oral cavity. It can also affect how the teeth grow in and their
tongue position.

All of those factors contribute to whether or not they’re going
to have dental problems or speech and language problems. It’s
important to talk to your pediatric dentist and your
pediatrician. If they’re noting that there are concerns going on
they can refer you to a speech language pathologist to address
the speech and language problems or the feeding difficulties.

Robyn: Thank you so much for answering that, and thank you to our
viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

What Age A Child Should Master The Stairs | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s webisode a Pediatric Physical Therapist gives viewers a few guidelines for the ages a child should be able to alternate feet walking up and down stairs.

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • The ages a child should walk up and down stairs
  • The ages a child should alternate feet walking up and down stairs

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I am your host Robyn
Ackerman, and today I’m standing with Pediatric Physical
Therapist Leida van Oss. Can you tell us at what age a child
should be able to alternate feet going up or down stairs?

Leida: Sure. A child should be able to master going up stairs
independently by two. It’s expected for them to alternate feet,
one on each step, right then left, right then left by three.
They say three because they have to be tall enough and strong
enough in order to get up the stairs. If not, then usually
there’s an underlying strength deficit that needs to be
addressed.

Robyn: Okay, great. Thank you so much Leida.

Leida: Thanks.

Robyn: And thank you to our viewers, and remember keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

Signs Your Child Is Ready For The Potty

In today’s webisode a Board Certified Behavior Analyst Gives us the signs to look for when beginning potty training with a child!  To read a blog on the 10 Do’s and Don’ts for Potty Training, click here.

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • The signs to look for if your child is ready for potty training
  • What directions your child should be able to follow in order to use the potty
  • Why the length of your child’s attention span matters

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.Robyn: Hello, and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host,
Robyn Ackerman, and today I’m standing here with Katie Sadowski,
a behavioral analyst. Katie, can you tell our viewers how to
know when your child is ready for potty training?Katie: Yes. For your child to be ready for potty training, you want to
look for certain signs. One sign that you want to notice is that
your child is showing a desire and want. There is an interest
that your child is showing in regards to being potty trained.
They’re now starting to stay clean, stay dry, and they’re
excited about it, and they’re happy. They also are wanting to
wear big kids’ underpants. Another thing that you’ll see is that
they’re taking an interest in what you’re doing when you’re
going to the bathroom and asking questions about what are you
doing or why are you doing that.

Some other things that are helpful when potty training are
looking at the fact, “Can your child follow simple directions?”
When you’re using the bathroom, there are a lot of one-step
directions that we have to complete. You go in, you turn on the
light, you close the door, you have to pull down your pants,
your underwear. So there are a lot of different things that your
child needs to be able to do.

Another thing is just making sure that your child can sit and
actually engage in an activity for a certain amount of time. If
they’re very quick to get frustrated or agitated, that will make
it hard in the potty training process.

Some other things that are good to notice is that your child is
staying clean or dry for a longer amount of time. Being able to
hold their bladder for longer, also shows that they’re getting
ready and that they’re capable of doing it. Some other things
that are helpful are that your child can easily pull up and pull
down their underpants as well as pants.

You want to make sure that your child is capable of walking or
running to the bathroom. When you’re potty training, it’s not
always, “There’s the bathroom.” You might be a little bit away,
so your child has to be able to get there in time.

Those are some things that you should definitely be looking for
and being aware of.

Robyn: All right. Thank you so much, Katie.

Katie: Thank you.

Robyn: And thank you to our viewers, and remember keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

3 Things To Help A Child Focus With Sensory Processing Disorder | Pediatric Therapy Tv

A Pediatric Occupational Therapist shows us 3 things that can help a child with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) sit and or focus more.

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • What a weighted blanket can do
  • How a fidget toy can help your child with Sensory Processing Disorder
  • What product can help your child sit in a chair

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I am your host,
Robyn Ackerman. Today I’m standing with Lindsay Miller, a
pediatric occupational therapist.

Lindsay, can you show us three things that a child may benefit
from using who has Sensory Processing Disorder?

Lindsay: Sure. I’ve got to start off with showing you a weighted
blanket. A weighted blanket is great for kids with Sensory
Processing Disorder who need a lot of movement to function to
their maximum ability. I think using a weighted blanket is a
great option. It’s basically just a regular blanket that’s much
heavier. They can put it on their lap, or when they’re lying
down they can put it on top of themselves.

It provides a lot of deep pressure input to their muscles and
their joints, which is very calming for the body. It decreases
the amount of movement that they need so that they can sit and
do homework or play a game, or whatever it is that they need to
do.

The next thing is a fidget toy. A fidget toy is also good for
kids who like to touch a lot of things or like to move around a
lot. It’s a really simple thing. It could be something like a
koosh ball or a stress ball. They can keep it in their pocket or
hold onto it. It’s to help them have something they can play
with and keep their hands busy while they’re doing homework or
when they’re supposed to be listening so that they can attend to
a task.

Robyn: And those are good for circle time, right?

Lindsay: Yes, great for circle time. It’s also good for when they are in
school and they need to be sitting and doing their work. They
can have something to play with while they’re writing.

Robyn: Wonderful.

Lindsay: And the other thing is a Move-n-Sit Disc. This is essentially a
plastic desk that has a textured side on one side and the other
is a little bit smoother. You put it right on their chair and it
allows them to wiggle around so that they get the movement that
they need instead of wandering away from their chair or rocking
in their chair.

Robyn: Great. Thank you so much, Lindsay, and thank you to our
viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

How To Prepare Your Child With SPD For a Birthday Party | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s webisode a Pediatric Occupational Therapist gives practical tips for a child with Sensory Processing Disorder to get the most out of attending birthday parties. To read a blog on SPD and parties click here.

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • How to prepare your child with SPD prior to the party
  • Strategies on how to calm your child down during the party
  • How to make your child feel involved at the party

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello, and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I am your host,
Robyn Ackerman, and today I’m standing with Marissa Edwards, a
Pediatric Occupational Therapist. Marissa, our viewers would
love to know how you can best prepare a child with sensory
processing disorder to go to a birthday party.

Marissa: Every child is going to be different. So different sensory
strategies are going to work with different kids, but these are
some general things that you can try out.

So, first of all, help the child to get lots of heavy work and
movement in before the party. It’s going to help their body to
feel very regulated, and it’s going to help them to participate
too. You want to talk with your child ahead of time about what
to expect at the party, what’s going to happen. It would
probably be helpful if you could get a hold of the birthday
child’s parents ahead of time and ask them what is going to
happen at the party, so that you can review all of those things
with your child, they know what to expect.

If any games are going to be played during the party, you can
practice those games ahead of time. If the birthday party is
going to take place at a venue other than the birthday child’s
house, you could take you child to go visit the venue ahead of
time, so that they can scope out the place, they can see what
the environment’s like, see what the energy is like inside the
place, and that will help them to feel prepared.

If your child does become overwhelmed at the party, you want to
come up with some strategies ahead of time so that your child
has some ideas in their head before the party of things that
they can do to help themselves calm down. One thing that they
could do is they could have a fidget with them. This can be
anything. It could be a stuffed animal. It could be like a
little koosh ball that they can play with. It could be putty,
something to just help their fingers and hands to be occupied.
It can help to calm them down.

Another thing that you can let you child know, as a strategy, is
that if they do feel uncomfortable, if they do feel overwhelmed,
they can remove themselves from the group and go to the bathroom
for a minute, just to kind of, you know, regroup themselves.
They also can know that they don’t have to participate in
everything that’s happening in the party. If they want to sit
out, that’s fine. If they don’t want to sing the happy birthday
song, because a lot of times that can be very overwhelming for
kids, they don’t have to sing with the rest of the kids. It’s
okay.

Another idea is that you can have your child help to pick out
the birthday present ahead of time. By involving them in that
process, that can create some investment with your child in
what’s happening so that once they get into that situation
which, you know the opening presents time is often very exciting
and loud, they will know what’s happening, they can maybe be
excited about having their friend open their present, which can
help them feel involved and excited.

Robyn: All right, thank you. It sounds like a lot of preparation is
needed to make these children feel more comfortable.

Marissa: Yeah, it really kind of is, and hopefully as they get older and
they get more birthday party experiences under their belt and
they know more of what to expect, it will get easier as they get
older and mature.

Robyn: All right. Thank you so much, Marissa.

Marissa: You’re welcome.

Robyn: And thank you to our viewers and remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s, LearnMore.me.

What is Oral Motor | Pediatric Therapy Tv

Pediatric Speech and Language Pathologist explains what Oral Motor is and how it develops in babies through childhood. For more on Oral Motor and feeding problems read this blog: https://www.nspt4kids.com/feeding/oral-motor-and-feeding-difficulties-in-young-children/

In this video you will learn:

  • What is Oral Motor
  • How babies can build oral muscles
  • How oral motor realtes to speech

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. Today I’m standing here with Allison Raino, a
pediatric speech and language pathologist.

Allison, a question we get a lot from our viewers is what
exactly is oral motor and how does it relate to speech?

Allison: Oral motor is essentially the strength and coordination of the
oral muscles in the mouth. There are thousands of receptors and
muscles in the face that all need to work in conjunction with
each other in order to say speech sounds accurately, as well as
being important for feeding and swallowing.

Many of our responses are reflexive, such as coughing and
swallowing. Those muscles need to be strong enough. We do those
while we are sleeping so we don’t even think about those while
we are doing them. Building up their strength is important, and
is especially important for babies and toddlers. We want to
provide an environment where they are exploring the environment
orally so we are providing multiple ways to develop that oral
muscle strength and coordination.

As you know, babies stick everything that they find in their
mouth. That’s their first way of learning about their
environment – it goes right in their mouth. We want to encourage
that, because with that they are learning a variety of different
tongue movements as well as increasing their jaw strength.

How that relates to speech is we see their development grow from
the cooing stage, where it’s the very basic sounds of the vowel
sounds. As their muscles mature and they become stronger and
more coordinated, we see the babbling stage, and then eventually
the move up to true words and then to phrases. We want to
encourage them to develop those patterns and provide a variety
of opportunities for them to strengthen their muscles as well as
coordinate them.

Robyn: Great. Thank you so much. And thank you to our viewers. And
remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.