Anxiety Disorders in Children- What Are They and What to Do? | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s Webisode, a pediatric social worker explains ways to determine if your child has an anxiety disorder.  You will walk away confident knowing there is help available for your child in the event your child experiences the disorder symptoms.

In this video you will learn:

  • How to tell if your child suffers from an anxiety disorder
  • What you can do to check the validity of the disorder
  • Best approach to take when determining an anxiety disorder

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman.

Today I’m sitting here with Michelle Winterstein, a pediatric
social worker. Michelle, can you tell us what are some signs a
child may suffer from an anxiety disorder?

Michelle: Absolutely, Robyn. All children suffer from anxiety from time
to time. However, some signs to look out for that your child may
suffer from an anxiety disorder would be clinginess to parents,
panicking at the thought of meeting new people or going to new
places, stomachaches or headaches before school or frequent
trips to the nurse’s office, trouble sleeping or irritability.

What you really want to consider is whether this anxiety is
typical for your child’s age and is the anxiety pervasive. If
you’re ever in doubt as to the depth of your child’s anxiety
symptoms, don’t leave that decision up to yourself. It’s always
best to contact a medical professional.

Robyn: Thank you so much, Michelle.

Michelle: Thank you, Robyn.

Robyn: And thank you to our viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

Homework Station Planning | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s Webisode, a pediatric occupational therapist explains techniques on how to setup the ideal homework environment for your child.  She will cover various techniques that will help kids to enhance their homework corner at home.

In this video you will learn:

  • What setup will help the child to concentrate better when doing homework
  • What materials to use to setup the homework station
  • Long term setup for the child when doing homework

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman.

Today I’m standing with Lindsey Miller, a pediatric occupational
therapist. Lindsey is going to show us exactly what a homework
station should look like. Lindsey?

Lindsey: Today I’m going to show you what a homework station should look
like that will maximize your child’s ability to complete their
homework.

The first thing to keep in mind with a homework station is that
ideally you want it to be in a separate location from their
bedroom and from other things going on in the house so that they
know that when they go to this place, that’s where I do my
homework.

Another thing to keep in mind is the location of the desk. It
would be best if it was up against a blank wall so that there
are no visual distractions, no pictures or clutter so it can
allow them to really focus on what they’re doing.

Another consideration is the actual layout of the desk. You want
them to have just their homework and a pencil on the desk and
nothing else. We want to decrease the clutter so that they can
focus on what they’re doing. It’s also a good idea for them to
have their backpack nearby so if they need anything from their
backpack they can just grab it and use it right away rather than
getting up from their chair and going to a different room to
find other items they may need. Also, if your desk has drawers
it’s a good idea to put all of the materials that they may need
in the drawers, such as a calculator, a ruler, extra paper,
markers and things like that so everything is in one location.

They can also use a move-and-sit disc. This is just a circular
disc that they can sit in on their chair. It allows them to
wiggle around in their chair so if the child likes to move
around a lot they won’t have to get up and move around. They can
just sit in their chair and wiggle around. Also, when they’re
sitting it’s a good idea for them to sit with their hips, knees,
and elbows at a 90 degree angle because this will help them
write better, more efficiently, and a little bit easier.

Another thing to keep in mind is good lighting. You want them to
be in a room with good lighting so they can see what they’re
doing. If your child gets very distracted by noises, sometimes
it’s a good idea to use headphones that cover their ears and
play some calming music that will help them focus on their
homework.

Robyn: Thank you, Lindsey, and thank you to our viewers for watching.
And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

Low Muscle Tone Signs To Look Out For in Your Child | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s Webisode, a Pediatric Occupational Therapist explains different ways to determine how your child may have a low muscle tone and what you can do once you figure out the symptoms.

In this video you will learn:

  • The meaning of muscle tone
  • How you can determine if your child  has low muscle tone
  • What to do when discovering the symptoms of low muscle tone

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. Today I’m standing here with Pediatric Occupational
Therapist Dana Pais.

Dana, can you tell us what are some signs to identify a child
who may have low muscle tone?

Dana: Muscle tone refers to the muscle’s ability to sustain a contraction.
It’s different than strength, which refers to the muscle’s
power. To identify a child who has low muscle tone, you may see
them do things such as slouching when they’re sitting in a
chair, or having difficulty holding their head upright when
seated at a desk. You may see them prop their head on their
hands or lay their head down on the desk.

You may also see a child have difficulty sitting for extended
periods of time, particularly without back support, and you may
also see them sitting in the ‘W’ position when they’re on the
floor, which is when their legs are splayed out to the side in
the shape of a ‘W’.

You can’t actually change muscle tone, but what you can do is
strengthen the muscles around the joints so that it can help
compensate, and then the child can complete their daily tasks.

Robyn: All right. Thank you so much, Dana, and thank you to our
viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

HOW TO ENCOURAGE YOUR CHILD TO DO HOMEWORK | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s Webisode, a Pediatric Behavior Analyst explains techniques on how to encourage your child to do homework. She will cover various approaches to help the parent understand the child’s behavior and assist him to want to do homework as a result.

In this video you will learn:

  • What goals can a parent set to help the child do homework
  • The significance of adaptive behavior with the approach to homework
  • Ways to help your child want to do homework

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. Today I’m standing with Behavior Analyst Katie
Sadowski.

Katie, can you give us some pointers on how to encourage a child
to do homework?

Katie: Yes. To help your child get more involved with their homework,
some things that you can do are create a schedule in which
there’s an exact day and time that your child will do the
homework. Looking at weekdays, they can do their homework right
when they get home from school or maybe they want to do it after
dinner.

Another thing is the weekends. It is usually best to have your
child do homework on Friday so they’re not rushing on Sunday
night trying to get it done. With this schedule of the time, you
definitely want to have your child involved. Have them pick out
the time and just be creative with that. With that being done,
you do want to stick to having that schedule and always do
homework at that time.

Even with a schedule, there might be situations where your child
will want to do something else. He might want to go play
basketball or play Wii. In those situations you want to use
‘first/then’ directives. You’re still going to stick to that
schedule. You’re going to tell your child, “First you can do
your homework, and then you can go play basketball.”

Another thing that can be helpful is having a designated area to
do homework. To do that, pick an area in the house. You want to
find somewhere where there aren’t a lot of distractions, maybe
in the kitchen doing it at the table or at the computer or
office studio. Those would be great choices. Even going to the
library and having his homework be done there. With your
designated area, you do want to go ahead and have all the
utensils that the child would need; pencils, paper, markers,
whatever they would need, so they’re not wasting time and
prolonging the homework process.

Another thing that can be done is providing praise for your
child and giving them encouragement, “Great job doing your
work,” and, “I like how you’re being so studious.” With more
challenging things, you can do things in regards to giving them
tangible reinforcement. Maybe they had a really big task or a
really big project that they spent a lot of time on and were
nervous about. You can do an extra little, “Let’s go get some
ice cream,” or, “You got an A on that test. I’m so happy. I know
you wanted this toy,” just a little more reinforcement. You
don’t always want to give that reinforcement because you want
them to be doing their homework on their own, but that’s just
helpful for harder subjects or things that they might struggle
with.

Another thing is that when your child is doing homework, you
should also be quiet. You don’t want to be doing things that are
going to be fun and exciting that your child would want to do.
Try to avoid playing on the computer, doing Wii Fit, and things
of that nature. At that time you can be paying your bills or
responding to emails, something that’s just a little more low-
key and your child won’t want to be involved with.

Robyn: All right. Thank you so much. Those are actually really
wonderful tips. Thank you to our viewers, and remember, keep on
blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

Separation Anxiety in Children | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s Webisode, a Licensed Professional Counselor explains how Separation Anxiety is common among children and what you can do to recognize the signs and assess the problem.  For 10 Tips On How To Get Your Toddler Acclimated To A New Caregiver, Click Here.

In this video you will learn:

  • The different signs children exhibit when they have separation anxiety
  • What a parent could do in order to assess separation anxiety
  • How can a parent help a child cope with the problem

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. I’m standing here with Licensed Professional Counselor
Marnie Ehrenberg.Marnie, can you please give us some tips on how to handle
children who may exhibit some signs of separation anxiety?

Marnie: Sure. Separation anxiety is really normal up until about one-
and-a-half, but you might still see it lingering around up to
two. I think that there are definitely things that you can do to
help your child learn how to get through it and not just say,
‘Okay, I’m not going to leave if it’s going to scare you’.

Most importantly, if you say you’re going to go, you should go.
You can help them plan what they’re going to do to have fun or
feel safe and what’s going to happen when you get home. I think
having that kind of plan really helps.

I also think that having a safety object or transitional object
helps, so a favorite character or favorite stuffed animal, and
who is going to watch over them while mom’s gone. Those are
things you can use for much younger. If your child is a little
bit older and still struggling with it, you might want to get
help from a professional.

Robyn: All right. Thank you so much for helping us with that question,
and thank you to our viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

What Causes Speech Delay In Twins | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s webisode, a pediatric speech and language pathologist explains what may cause delayed speech in twins.  For more on speech development in twins, read this blog.

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • Possible causes of speech delay in twins
  • What is “twin talk”
  • When to seek help from a professional

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman, and today I’m standing here with Speech and Language
Pathologist, Tanya Lotzof. Tanya, can you tell us are twins more
prone to delayed speech?

Tanya: Robyn, that’s a great question, and I think the most important
things to consider are the possible causes for speech and
language delays in twins.

Let’s start off with perinatal factors. Prematurity is common
among twins as is low birth weight. Then there are environmental
factors. Oftentimes there’s less one-on-one interaction with
twins. There’s also something called twin talk, which is a
language that twins often use between each other that they can
understand but other people can’t understand. And then there’s
oftentimes where one twin will talk more than the other twin,
and that can put them at a greater risk.

So if you are concerned, it’s important to seek guidance form a
licensed speech language pathologist and see what’s really going
on.

Robyn: All right. Thank you so much for those answers.

Tanya: Sure.

Robyn: And thank you to our viewers and remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me

What is the Vestibular System | Pediatric Therapy TV

In today’s webisode a Pediatric Occupational Therapist explains to our viewers what the vestibular system is.  Find out more on the vestibular system from our conditions page by clicking here Click here to read a blog on Vestibular Senses

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • What the foundation of the Vestibular System is
  • What Receptors are
  • How the Vestibular System relates to our bodies

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn. Robyn: Hello, and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I am your host, Robyn Ackerman. Today I am sitting here with Dana Pais, a Pediatric Occupational Therapist. Dana, can you explain to everybody, what is the vestibular system? Dana: The vestibular system is part of your nervous system and it’s actually located in your inner ear. It is the foundation for the sensation of gravity and it responds to changes in head position, and it also contributes to balance and equilibrium. There are two vestibular receptors. One responds to gravity and the other responds to movement. The interaction of these two receptors tells us where our body is in space and how our body is moving. Robyn: Thank you so much for explaining that, and thank you to our viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming. Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

3 Tips For A Bed Time Routine | Pediatric Therapy TV

In today’s webisode, a Board Certified Behavior Analyst gives viewers 3 practical tips on how to get your child into a bed-time routine.    Read this blog for more bed-time routine tips:

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • What type of bed-time schedule to create
  • Why consistency matter when starting a bed-time routine
  • At what time to start your bed-time routine with your child

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn. Robyn Ackerman: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I am your host, Robyn Ackerman, and today I’m standing with a behavior analyst, Katie Sadowski. Katie, can you please give our viewers three tips to getting a child into a bedtime routine? Katie Sadowski: Yes. In regards to getting your child into a bedtime routine, that is something that can be tricky. One thing that is very helpful is creating a schedule. With this schedule, it should be a visual schedule so that the child can see the different pictures. You want to incorporate the different things that need to be done in the bedtime routine. If the child is age appropriate, he should definitely be involved with helping create this schedule. Some things that should be in a bedtime routine schedule would be things like taking a bath, putting on your pajamas, brushing your teeth, getting a drink of water, picking a friend to go to bed with so his favorite teddy bear or maybe just a favorite doll, any kind of stuffed animal that your child likes, as well as reading a book, and then saying goodnight. With this schedule, you want to make sure that any of the activities you use, they are calming. You don’t want to be having activities that would get your child very energetic and hyper. That would defeat the purpose. Also when you are using the schedule, you want to make sure that you pick a time and stick with that time. In regards to the time, you would want to start the schedule about an hour before so that the child is actually done with the schedule and sleeping when you do want him in bed. So, for example, if you want your child sleeping at 7:00, you would start the schedule at about 6:00. Also, with the schedule, it’s very helpful if you can make it to where the kid can put a sticker or a checkmark after he completes each activity. That way, he can see the different steps that he’s completing and how that accomplishments. And one more thing that, at the end, after your story and you say your goodnights, you do then want to go ahead and let your child know that you are going to come back and check on them to make sure they’re sleeping. You don’t want to let your child think, well, mom and dad are gone, so now I can go play or I can sit up and do what I want. Give them that warning that you will be back, and if you do come back and they are up, just say, “Okay, goodnight. I’ll be back a little later.” And that’s something that can definitely help get your child in a routine. Robyn; All right. Thank you so much, Katie. Katie: You’re welcome. Robyn: And thank you to our viewers, and remember, keep on blossoming. Announncer; This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

What is Echolalia and How Does It Relate To Autism | Pediatric Therapy Tv

In today’s webisode, a pediatric Speech and Language Pathologist sheds some light on what Echolalia is and it’s connection to Autism.  For more information on Echolalia, read this blog: https://www.nspt4kids.com/parenting/echolalia-what-is-it/

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • What Echolalia is
  • How Echolalia relates to Autism
  • When Echolalia is developmentally appropriate

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. Today I’m standing here with pediatric speech and
language pathologist Deanna Swallow. Deanna, can you explain to
us what is echolalia and how does it relate to children with
autism?

Deanna: Sure. Echolalia refers to the imitation of spoken language. To
a certain extent, echolalia can be typical. For example, when
you have a child under the age of 12 months, we want them doing
a lot of repeating of our gestures and our speech sounds. You
might see children repeating words and phrases up until about
age four.

After a certain point, echolalia is considered atypical. For
children with autism, one of the salient features of autism is
deficits or weaknesses in understanding and use of spoken
language. Oftentimes, children with autism will use echolalia,
and that can be an indicator of weaknesses in spoken language.

There are many different reasons that children will use
echolalia. Sometimes it can be to help them process language.
For example, if I ask a child, “How old are you,” and they say,
“Old are you,” they may be rehearsing that question in their
head to help them answer it. If they do rehearse the question
and then give me an appropriate response, then I know they may
have been using echolalia to help process language.

Some children might use echolalia because they simply don’t know
what to say. They know something is supposed to go here but
they’re not sure what, so they might just repeat what you said
as a means to communicate.

Robyn: Thank you so much for clearing that up, and thank you to our
viewers. And remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.

How To Know When Your Child Is Ready For A Two Wheeler | Pediatric Therapy Tv

http://Learnmore.me In Today’s Webisode, a pediatric physical therapist answers a question from a viewer on how to know when a child is ready to ride a two wheeler bicycle.  For quick tips on taking off the training wheels, read this blog: https://www.nspt4kids.com/therapy/taking-off-the-training-wheels/

In This Video You Will Learn:

  • At what ages a child is ready for a two wheeler
  • What types of bikes children should master before a two wheeler
  • What the physical requirements are prior to mastering a two wheeler bike

Video Transcription:

Announcer: From Chicago’s leading experts in pediatrics to a worldwide
audience, this is Pediatric Therapy TV, where we provide experience and
innovation to maximize your child’s potential. Now your host, here’s Robyn.

Robyn: Hello and welcome to Pediatric Therapy TV. I’m your host, Robyn
Ackerman. Today I’m standing with pediatric physical therapist
Leida Van Oss.

Leida, we have a question from one of our viewers. Jessica is
asking, “How do you know when your child is ready to ride a two-
wheeler?”

Leida: There are many signs that you can tell if your child is ready
to ride a two-wheeler. The first and most important thing is
have they mastered riding a tricycle or a scooter bike? Little
scooter bikes are the little mini two-wheelers that have two
wheels but no pedals or cranks or anything like that, so they
just push their feet along and then lift their feet up.

If they’re really good at doing that and they can lift their
feet and hold it for a good 10 seconds without falling, then
they’ve mastered that balance that’s needed to go to two wheels
with pedaling. Tricycling is also really important to get that
reciprocal motion throughout their feet.

Also, your child needs to be strong enough, tall enough, and
have the balance and coordination in order to ride a two-wheeler
bike. Usually, this is about four or five years old.

Robyn: Great. Thank you so much, Leida, and thank you to Jessica for
submitting her question, and thank you to our viewers. And
remember, keep on blossoming.

Announcer: This has been Pediatric Therapy TV, where we bring peace of
mind to your family with the best in educational programming. To
subscribe to our broadcast, read our blogs, or learn more, visit
our website at LearnMore.me. That’s LearnMore.me.